Avoid This Novel Treat

Warning: Avoid these novel treats in shopping malls and restaurants

News briefs


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If your grandkids urge you to indulge them in a popular new snack at the mall, just say no. The FDA is warning that consuming products with liquid nitrogen added at the last minute can lead to injury. The products are marketed under names such as “Dragon’s Breath” and “Nitro Puff.” They’re cheese puffs or cereal pieces that are frozen in liquid nitrogen and then dipped in a special sauce. When you put them in your mouth, the products release vapor that looks like smoke. Liquid nitrogen is also added to some cocktails to make them look like they’re emitting fog. But the FDA says all of these products can cause severe damage to skin and internal organs and may cause breathing problems. The agency advises you to avoid the products.

Measles in Massachusetts

 

 

 

STATE HEALTH OFFICIALS ALERT RESIDENTS ABOUT

POTENTIAL EXPOSURE TO MEASLES AT AN AREA HOSPITAL AND OTHER LOCATIONS

Those exposed or developing symptoms are urged to call their healthcare provider

 

BOSTON (August, 23, 2018) The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) has confirmed a case of measles which was diagnosed at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center (LHMC).  The individual, during their infectious period, was in a number of locations that could have resulted in exposures to other people. Measles is very contagious and people who are not immune and visited the locations on the below specified dates may be at risk for developing measles or may now be developing symptoms of the disease.  Anyone who visited these locations on any of these dates during the times listed is advised to contact their health care provider to confirm their immunization status.

 

DPH urges all those who do not know their measles immunization status to get vaccinated with at least one dose of Measles Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine.  Measles vaccine given within 72 hours of exposure may prevent measles disease, and vaccination beyond this window will provide protection from subsequent exposures. Lahey hospital has been reaching out to individuals at high risk of exposure, and is collaborating with DPH and local health authorities to ensure that all exposed individuals have this information.

 

Exposures to this individual may have occurred at the following locations and times:

Facility:                                                             Location:                                           Dates and times

Logan Airport Terminal B                              Boston                                               8/15, 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Lexington High School Library                     251 Waltham St., Lexington          8/16, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Irving H. Mabee Town Pool Complex         80 Worthen Rd., Lexington           8/19, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Lahey Outpatient Center, Lexington          16 Hayden Ave., Lexington            8/20, 11:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

LHMC, Burlington                                           Emergency Department                 8/20, 1:00 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.

LHMC, Burlington                            Inpatient Units 7 Central, 6 Central and 5 Central (ICU and CCU)                                                  8/20 from 8:00 p.m. to 8/21 at 9:00 p.m.

 

Those who were exposed and begin to develop symptoms of measles should call their healthcare provider before visiting an office, clinic or emergency department. Visiting a healthcare facility may put others at risk and should be avoided. Anyone who has had measles in the past or has received two doses of the vaccine is unlikely to develop measles even if exposed.

 

Early symptoms of measles occur 10 days to 2 weeks after exposure and may resemble a cold (with fever, cough, runny nose, and red eyes) and a rash occurs on the skin 2-4 days after the initial symptoms develop. The rash usually appears first on the head and then moves downward. The rash typically lasts a few days and then disappears in the same order.

 

People with measles may be contagious up to four days before the rash appears and for four days after the day the rash appears.

 

People who have had measles in the past or who have been vaccinated against measles per CDC recommendations are considered immune. The CDC recommendations are:

  • Children. Children should receive their first dose of Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccine at 12-15 months.  School-aged children need two doses of MMR vaccine.
  • Adults. Adults should have at least one dose of MMR vaccine. Certain groups at high risk need two doses of MMR, such as international travelers, health care workers, and college students. Adults born in the U.S. before 1957 are considered to be immune to measles from past exposures.

 

“Fortunately, most people have been vaccinated against measles,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Catherine Brown. “Our efforts now are to identify people who may be at risk of getting ill and to get them vaccinated.  If they become ill we ask them to telephone their providers rather than going directly to a healthcare facility.”

 

For additional information, contact your local health department or DPH at 617-983-6800.  Further information is available on the DPH website at http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/docs/dph/cdc/factsheets/measles.pdf

 

West Nile Virus

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health has elevated the West Nile virus risk level to moderate statewide. This wide-scale increase was driven by expanding and intensifying positive mosquito findings.

 

For additional information on how to protect yourself from mosquito-borne illness, please visit.

 

http://www.mass.gov/dph/mosquito

 

Avoid Mosquito Bites:

Apply Insect Repellent when Outdoors. Use a repellent with DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide), permethrin, picaridin (KBR 3023), oil of lemon eucalyptus [p-methane 3, 8-diol (PMD)] or IR3535 according to the instructions on the product label. DEET products should not be used on infants under two months of age and should be used in concentrations of 30% or less on older children. Oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under three years of age.

 

Be Aware of Peak Mosquito Hours. The hours from dusk to dawn are peak biting times for many mosquitoes. Consider rescheduling outdoor activities that occur during evening or early morning.

 

Clothing Can Help Reduce Mosquito Bites. Wearing long-sleeves, long pants and socks when outdoors will help keep mosquitoes away from your skin.

 

Mosquito-Proof Your Home

Drain Standing Water. Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Limit the number of places around your home for mosquitoes to breed by either draining or discarding items that hold water. Check rain gutters and drains. Empty any unused flowerpots and wading pools, and change water in birdbaths frequently.

 

Install or Repair Screens. Keep mosquitoes outside by having tightly-fitting screens on all of your windows and doors.

 

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Emergency Survival Kit

What Do You Need In A Survival Kit?
Being prepared means being equipped with the proper supplies you may need in the event of an emergency or disaster. Keep your supplies in an easy-to-carry emergency preparedness kit that you can use at home or take with you in case you must evacuate.

At a minimum, you should have the basic supplies listed below:

1. Water: one gallon per person, per day (3-day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home)

2. Food: non-perishable, easy-to-prepare items (3-day supply for evacuation, 2-week supply for home)

3. Flashlight [Available on the Red Cross Store]

4. Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible) [Available on the Red Cross Store]

5. Extra batteries

6. First aid kit [Available on the Red Cross Store]

7. Medications (7-day supply) and medical items

8. Multi-purpose tool

9. Sanitation and personal hygiene items

10. Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, insurance policies)

11. Cell phone with chargers

12. Family and emergency contact information

13. Extra cash

14. Emergency blanket [Available on the Red Cross Store]

15. Map(s) of the area

Consider the needs of all family members and add supplies to your kit:

  • Medical supplies (hearing aids with extra batteries, glasses, contact lenses, syringes, etc)
  • Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)
  • Games and activities for children
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)
  • Two-way radios
  • Extra set of car keys and house keys
  • Manual can opener
Additional supplies to keep at home or in your survival kit based on the types of disasters common to your area:

  • Whistle
  • N95 or surgical masks
  • Matches
  • Rain gear
  • Towels
  • Work gloves
  • Tools/supplies for securing your home
  • Extra clothing, hat and sturdy shoes
  • Plastic sheeting
  • Duct tape
  • Scissors
  • Household liquid bleach
  • Entertainment items
  • Blankets or sleeping bags

Be Red Cross Ready

Shingrix Vaccine

Good News!  As of May 1, 2018 Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts will reimburse  for the Shingrix vaccine for adults age 50+.  Harvard Pilgrim may be the next insurance to sign on.  Other private insurers will allow payment  beginning September 1, 2018.  Unfortunately, Medicare will not pay for the Shingrix vaccine.  A second injection is required  2-6 months after the first.  Please call the office for more information (508) 833-8020 or to schedule an appointment.

Flu Vaccine

It is not too late to have your flu vaccine!   Please call (508) 833-8020 to schedule an appointment.  People with some chronic illnesses, 65 or older, and younger than 2 years should be treated with Tamiflu within 48 hours of having flu symptoms.

HPV Vaccine

Imagine if you could protect your child against cancer. Turns out, you can – with the HPV vaccine.  To highlight this, the American Cancer Society recently released a video series of HPV-related cancer survivors sharing their stories. These individuals serve as a powerful reminder of the importance of the HPV vaccine and underscore the need for all parents to talk to their children’s doctors to learn more.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus spread by close skin-to-skin contact. It is so common that nearly all sexually active adults have had at least one type of HPV at some point in their lifetime.  Around 80 million people in the US currently have HPV and 14 million people are newly infected each year. While most cases of HPV clear on their own, some can cause cancer.

A recent report showed that the current number of cancers caused by HPV is rising with an estimated 30,700 each year. Cervical cancer is the most common cancer caused by HPV in women, while in men; it most commonly leads to a type of head and neck cancer. Overall, HPV is thought to cause more than 90% of anal and cervical cancers, about 70% of vaginal and vulvar cancers, and more than 60% of penile cancers.

The HPV vaccine offers the best protection against these cancers when given at the recommended age – which is 2 doses if the patient starts the vaccine series before their 15th birthday and 3 doses if they start on or after their 15th birthday. Younger adolescents have a higher immune response so it’s best to vaccinate early. Young women can get the HPV vaccine through age 26 and young men can receive it through age 21 (age 26 in some cases).

Pediatric Flu Clinic

         Pediatric Flu Clinic

            Ages 5-18 Years

When:  Tuesday November 8, 2016

9AM-3PM

Where: Sandwich Public Health Nursing

270 Quaker Meetinghouse Road

East Sandwich, Ma. 02537

Cost:   There is no charge.  Please bring

insurance card, Mass Health,

Medicaid.

A parent or guardian must accompany the

child.

Flumist is NOT available this year.   Please call (508) 833-8020 with questions.

 

 

         

 

                                                                      


                                                                                 

 

 

Barnstable County Emergency Shelter System

 

Regional Shelter System

If you can’t leave the area and staying at home is not an option, then you can turn to the regional shelter system. Visit this map for an overview of the shelter system and the location of a shelter near you.

Important things to know about regional shelters

  1. You should look at going to a shelter the same way you would look at going on a trip. If you were planning to go away for a few days you would pack for the trip. The same goes for the shelter. You should arrive with at least three days worth of essentials. You wouldn’t leave your medications at home if you went on a trip, nor should you leave them behind when you go to a shelter.
  2. The stay at a shelter is not a vacation, and a shelter is not a hotel or a pharmacy. It is not a cruise ship but rather a lifeboat. The shelter provides a secure facility, a cot to sleep on, food and water, basic first aid, and functional assistance. Beyond that, it is up to you to pack and bring the essentials of your life including extra clothing, medications, and any medical equipment such as walkers, wheelchairs, and oxygen concentrators.
  3. If you live at home with the assistance of a caretaker, the caretaker must come to the shelter with you. If you have a visiting nurse, make sure you bring your medical supplies and let your nurse know which shelter you will be staying at.
  4. If you are bringing infants, babies, or toddlers to a shelter make sure you bring formula, food, diapers, wipes, changes of clothing, toys, and a “pack ‘n play” or portable crib and bedding.
  5. If you have a pet—a dog or cat, a bird perhaps—the Cape Cod Disaster Animal Response Team (CCDART) component of the shelter system supports the care of your pet(s) while you are in the shelter. Remember, you must check your pet(s) in first with CCDART before checking yourself into the human shelter. Please bring all your pet supplies to the shelter except for crates, which are provided by CCDART. You cannot sleep with your pet(s). Once your pet(s) are in the CCDART shelter, you will be able to see them during visiting hours, typically between 7:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.
  6. The reason every town on the Cape doesn’t have its own shelter is because of the expense and lack of volunteer resources to staff 15 separate shelters across the Cape. Volunteers deliver the vast majority of services provided at the six regional shelters. These volunteers work with groups including the American Red Cross (ARC), the Cape Cod Medical Reserve Corps (CCMRC), the Cape Cod Disaster Animal Response Team (CCDART), Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT), and AmeriCorps.